No Pain No Gain.

Did You Agree to “No Pain, No Gain”?

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Did You Agree to “No Pain, No Gain”?

No Pain No Gain.

Does anyone else have this hateful saying? Or bad.
Well, I must admit that I do not like to sweat. I hate oozing and oozing bodies, where your clothes stick and where everything is wet.

One moment you are hot, the other you are wet and cold. I realize that this discomfort prevents me from exercising and that my body moves in a healthy way.

I understand. And I have to remember that I live in a modern house, with two showers at my disposal. What is the problem with sweat?

But since when have we decided to apply this motto to everything? The belief that one must endure pain and stress to achieve professional excellence and satisfying and satisfying life?

No Pain No Gain.

Do you agree? Have you ever wondered why you thought you should suffer to succeed? Why would you want to work hard and tolerate large amounts of stress to win?

In recent years, the concept should only apply to exercise. He promised more value and reward for the price of hard work, even painful.

Jane Fonda, in 1982, emphasized the idea, as well as the expression “Feel the Burn”, in which she had promised that muscular pain was the result of solving the problem.

You have built muscle and stamina this way, she says. But would you be surprised to learn that the concept “no pain, no gain” existed long before 1982?

In fact, faith dates back to the beginning of the second century, when the term was interpreted as a spiritual lesson. Without the trouble of doing what God commands, there is no spiritual gain.

David B. Morris wrote this in The Scientist in 2005: “No pain, no gain” is a modern American mini-story: it squeezes the story of a protagonist who understands that the path to performance only passes through the difficulties.

“He described this as a modern form of Puritanism. But back to the idea that “without pain, without profit,” applied to everything, only guarantees that life and performance will be filled with stress and suffering.

No Pain No Gain.

Who really wants that? Certainly not me!

Life on planet earth should be focused on happiness, joy, and connection. No Pain. No Gain We are destined to flourish, to grow, to be creative, to change and to reproduce ourselves.
So why should we intentionally express the pain in our lives?

What makes people accept suffering to live a meaningful life?

Maybe you’re thinking right now: “Wait a minute, Joan!” However, it takes the pain, effort, and hard work to get something of value or importance, the only way I am really touched is hard work! Nothing has been easy, and if so, it means less to me. ”

Yes, I recognize that many things in life are not easy, or without putting our shoulder on the wheel, so to speak.
Suir a little. Past-past. Tap new growth.

However, what I want to suggest is that “pain” is not a natural consequence of profit.
Instead, the pain is a wake-up call, a spiritual lesson.

When pain enters your life, you have the opportunity to ask, “Why are you here, what lesson do I need to learn, what should I change or change?”

My belief, which took years to formulate, is that pain only appears in my life to wake me up!
Again and again, over the years, suffering from an unhappy marriage, toxic workplaces, painful relationships, and an impulse to succeed in the region of my choice, I have discovered in the long run that was not necessary.

But I thought I must have the pain to get there. To receive. Have a successful and abundant career. Until a serious health problem wakes me up!

Hello Joan, hello! What do you know that there is an easier, more fruitful and satisfying way?

Damn, that’s it, and the pain was my guide. If I had emotional, physical or spiritual pain, it was my chance to listen and change, to change or to let myself go.

What is there for you? Is it time that you give up the tired old slogan “No pain, no gain”? For, apart from very limited use of exercise (and not all exercises, count), PAIN IS A WAKE-UP CALL.

 

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